Visit the New 92Y Blog



n4_92Y_websiten4_92YTribeca_website
Interviews

Thursday, July 07, 2011
92Y Culture Klatsch Q&A With Dustin Guy Defa

imageDirector Dustin Guy Defa feature debut, Bad Fever, premiered at South By Southwest and continues to be beloved at festivals across the country. Gordon and The Whale wrote:

“BAD FEVER is a challenging, haunting piece of filmmaking that feels like it comes from a very personal place while exploring universal themes of loneliness and desolation. It’s the kind of movie that Hollywood used to make in the 1970s before the invention of the summer blockbuster and the even more recent catering to fanboy fantasies.”

Bad Fever is playing at 92YTribeca on July 11. So we’ve asked Dustin Guy Defa to be the next subject in the 92Y Culture Klatsch Q&A.

Where do you go for news when you start your day?
Indiewire, Filmmaker Magazine Blog, Hammer to Nail, The New York Times.  When I get my hands on an actual Times paper, I like that with my coffee.

What are your favorite websites?
I like the blogs my friends have, mostly. I also like Animals Being Dicks. Eléonore Hendricks’ website for her photography is always on my mind. David Lowery’s blog.

How much do you use Twitter and Facebook (or other social networking services)?
I’m trying not to use them too much. Facebook is a hard one to stay away from, Twitter is easier. I check up on them often but I would like to only look at them once a day.

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch Film All topics for Tribeca at 12:18pm | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Tuesday, June 21, 2011
Culture Klatsch: 92Y Q&A With Valerie Smaldone

imageOn June 28, Tommy James will sit down with 5-time Billboard Magazine Award winner Valerie Smaldone at 92nd Street Y for discussion about his life and career as documented in his autobiography, Me, the Mob, and the Music. Tommy James was a previous subject of the 92Y Culture Klatsch. Today, we have Valerie Smaldone’s answers. Without further adieu:

Where do you go for news when you start your day?

Get the top news headlines on Aol.com when I sign on to my email.

What are your favorite websites?

For subway information in NYC, hopstop.com, for food information, Zagat.com, for theater information: Theatermania.com, for shopping: Smartbargains.com.

How much do you use Twitter and Facebook (or other social networking services)?

I use Facebook and Linked In mainly for marketing and networking. Twitter, just to post links to articles I have written or to post information about classes I am teaching.

What book are you currently reading (or the last one you read)? Print or digital?

Curation Nation (print)

More...



Posted in The Arts Interviews Culture Klatsch All topics of 92nd Street Y at 3:06pm | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Tuesday, June 07, 2011
92Y Culture Klatsch: Q&A With Tommy James

image
Tommy James and his original band “the Tornadoes” in Niles, Michigan / via Facebook

You might remember Tommy James from a little band called Tommy James and The Shondells.  James has 23 gold singles, 9 platinum albums and over 100 million records sold worldwide. “I Think We’re Alone Now,” “Crystal Blue Persuasion,” “Mony Mony” and “Crimson and Clover” are some of our favorites, and when we first discovered ”Crimson and Clover” as a tween, we listened to it over and over again (pun intended).

On June 28, James will sit down with Valerie Smaldone at 92nd Street Y for discussion about his life and career as documented in his autobiography, Me, the Mob, and the Music. Released in 2010, the autobiography covers his relationship with Morris Levy, head of Roulette Records and front for the Genovese crime family; the pressure to make hit records; and his battle with prescription drugs, alcohol and recovery.

Here are Tommy James answers to the 92Y Culture Klatsch Q&A:

Where do you go for news when you start your day?

One, I turn on the TV, (ABC-TV) for local news and weather. Then I go to Drudge, then go to my own website to read the posts and respond to the fans.

What are your favorite websites?

My favorite websites are science sites such as Astronomy Picture of the Day Archive from NASA.

More...



Posted in The Arts Interviews Culture Klatsch All topics of 92nd Street Y at 10:57am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Thursday, June 02, 2011
Culture Klatsch: 92Y Q&A With Judge Sol Wachtler

imageJudge Sol Wachtler once held the highest judicial office in New York state—chief judge of the Court of Appeals. He was arrested in 1992, and sentenced to 13 months of imprisonment in a federal mental health prison unit. He’s spent the last two decades quietly rebuilding his life, writing a memoir about his time in prison, and getting his law license back.

On June 7 he’ll stop by 92YTribeca to share insight into his bout with mental illness, his rehabilitation and the steps he has taken to rebuild his life.

We sent him the Culture Klatsch Q&A to learn more about his culture and media consumption habits. He made quick work of it. His favorite websites? “None.”

Where do you go for news when you start your day?

The New York Times, MSNBC.

What are your favorite websites?

None.

How much do you use Twitter and Facebook (or other social networking services)?

Not at all.

What book are you currently reading (or the last one you read)? Print or digital?

The Dead Shall Rise (Oney), The Wizard of Lies (Henriques).

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch Talks All topics for Tribeca at 8:36am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Wednesday, June 01, 2011
92Y Culture Klatsch: Q&A With Elliott Kalan

imageOur friend Elliot Kalan, host of Closely Watched Films, is screening Son of Frankenstein tonight at 92YTribeca, with special guest Sara Schaefer. You might remember Elliot from his star turn in our web series, 92Y Show & Tell.

He’s also the latest subject to take part in the 92Y Culture Klatsch Q&A, our twelve questions that delve into the media and culture consumption habits of the interviewee. As you’ll learn below, Elliot is obsessed with staying up to date on “the progress of the Washington Square Park redesign,” and will occasionally daydream about cowboys and dinosaurs. 

Where do you go for news when you start your day?

NY1 is the alpha and omega of news for me—I can wait to hear the national stories, but I absolutely must know about the progress of the Washington Square Park redesign RIGHT NOW.

What are your favorite websites?

I spend a lot of time at Talking Points Memo for political news and the Onion A.V. Club for entertainment news. Otherwise I’m mostly looking for information about obscure movies, comic books, or cartoons, so I head to Mike Sterling’s Progressive Ruin and Mark Evanier’s News From Me

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch Film All topics for Tribeca at 9:00am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Tuesday, May 31, 2011
92Y Culture Klatsch: Q&A With Rabbi Dan Ain

image

Are you a Twitter or Facebook person?

Dan Ain, 92YTribeca’s Rabbi in residence, prefers Twitter. But he thinks Facebook has its moments. “...it can be,” he told us in the latest 92Y Culture Klatsch, “an InTouch or a People Magazine for the people that you do care about.”

Speaking of Twitter, just a short while ago, Rabbi Dan Ain inquired there: “Can we find a space to talk about #God in this town?”

We can and will this Friday, when 92YTribeca Rabbi in residence Dan Ain and Bill McGarvey host a Shabbat dinner at 92YTribeca with discussion about faith and culture.

Where do you go for news when you start your day?

Certainly not Cable TV. Drudge, The New York Times, Zerohedge, Al Jazeera, Haaretz, Russia Today, The Huffington Post, Google News and local papers. I think it’s important to listen to as many sides as possible and try to get an understanding of what it is they believe (or want to believe or want us to believe that they believe) is going on.

When a story breaks, I try to find a news source that’s as close to the situation as possible and yet still somewhat reliable - like a local paper, blogger or radio station (which I get via the “tune-in radio” app).

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch Jewish Programs All topics for Tribeca at 11:35am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Wednesday, May 25, 2011
92Y Culture Klatsch: Q&A With Mel & El
Mel & El, “a modern day Laverne & Shirley, but dirtier,” are real life best friends who have known each other since they were 12 years old. “Some people think we have psychological issues,” Mel told us.

Mel & El host a hilarious monthly show and are bringing it to 92YTribeca for the first time next week on June 2, along with extra special guest comedian Sue Funke.

They are also the latest subjects in the 92Y Culture Klatsch Q&A. And just like the title of their blog, Mel & El have things to tell.

Where do you go for news when you start your day?

Mel: To be honest, the first place we go for news is each other.
El: Good point. Usually by 8am there is some email thread or text situation happening where we are alerting each other to “MEM”.
Mel: You have to explain that.
El: Oh. That means “My Every Move”. It doesn’t have to do with ACTUAL news, but to us, it’s essential information.
Mel: Some people think we have psychological issues but we embrace our Codefriendency. 

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch Comedy All topics for Tribeca at 9:06am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Monday, May 16, 2011
92Y Culture Klatsch: Q&A With Steven Levy

imageSteven Levy, a senior writer at Wired and author of In The Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives, is the latest subject for Culture Klatsch, our new interview series focusing on the subjects’ media and culture diet.

Levy will be at 92YTribeca on May 25 with Steve Lohr, reporter at The New York Times, and David Kirkpatrick author of The Facebook Effect, for a panel discussion about Facebook and Google.

The companies are shaping up to be the greatest frenemies of this decade, as witnessed by the latest kerfuffle, which involved Facebook hiring a PR firm to place damaging stories about Google in the press. Fast Company called it an ”epic, escalating war.”

Without further adieu, here’s 92Y Culture Klatsch with Steven Levy:

Where do you go for news when you start your day?

I get The New York Times and WSJ on my Kindle. I used to get the printed Times, but I’m traveling a lot and the Kindle version follows me around, so I forgo the newsprint. After scanning those, I dive into the web.  My Twitter feed gives me a good selection of links. Hacker News, TechCrunch and Techmeme provide the tech lowdown. Romanesko and MediaGazer cover media stuff.

What are your favorite websites?

Besides Wired.com?  I go all over, but often find myself on Philly.com (my hometown), Edge.org, Baseball Prospectus, and the music sites Captains Dead, Cover Me, and Aquarium Drunkard.

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch All topics of 92nd Street Y at 9:48am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Thursday, May 12, 2011
The (Tentatively Named) 92Y Culture Diet Q&A With Constance Rosenblum

imageFor New Yorkers, The New York Times‘ City section was once a favorite part of Sunday afternoons. Constance Rosenblum was editor of The New York Times‘ City section and is our latest subject of The (Tentatively Named) 92Y Culture Diet Q&A. That’s how we learned Constance does not use Twitter or Facebook and is “devastated that “Mad Men” hasn’t yet returned.” Read the full Q&A below.

Next Wednesday, May 18, she’ll join David Masello and Leslie Nipkow at 92YTribeca to share and discuss some of the best writing the City section inspired. 

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch Talks All topics for Tribeca at 2:30pm | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Wednesday, May 04, 2011
The (Tentatively Named) 92Y Culture Diet Q&A With Tom Blunt

image

Meet the Lady host Tom Blunt is today’s subject of the (Tentatively Named) 92Y Culture Diet Q&A*, where we pry into the media and cultural consumption habits of our friends! In this Q&A we’ve learned, among other things, that Mr. Blunt refreshes the Drudge Report all day and thinks Edith Zimmerman, editor of The Hairpin, is an evil genius.

Read the whole thing below.

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch Film All topics for Tribeca at 8:00am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Monday, May 02, 2011
The (Tentatively Named) 92Y Culture Diet Q&A With Tom Feyer

We introduced the (Tentatively Named) 92Y Culture Diet Q&A on April 21 with Drew Dernavich, cartoonist at The New Yorker and FISTICUFFS! co-creator.

imageToday we have another for you with The New York Times Letters Editor Thomas Feyer. The 92Y Culture Diet Q&A asks the same 12 questions, focusing on the subjects media and culture consumption habits, with questions like “What are your favorite websites?”, “What magazines do you subscribe to?” and “What’s the last music purchase you made?”

Feyer with be here this Thursday, May 5, with The New York Times deputy editorial page editor Trish Hall. They’ll share secrets to writing opinion pieces that get published and discuss the effectiveness of opinion pieces in shaping policy and public opinion. See below for Feyer’s Q&A.

More...



Posted in Humanities Interviews Culture Klatsch All topics of 92nd Street Y at 10:08am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Thursday, April 21, 2011
Introducing The (Tentatively Named) 92Y Culture Diet Q&A

image

Drew Dernavich, cartoonist at The New Yorker and FISTICUFFS! co-creator, (where cartoonists battle the only way they know how—by drawing cartoons!) is the first subject of the new 92Y Culture Diet Q&A. Questions focus on discovering more about the subjects’ media and culture diet, for example, “What are your favorite websites?” and “What magazines do you subscribe to?”

The next FISTICUFFS! happens April 27 at 92YTribeca.

Without further adieu...take it away Drew Dernavich!

More...



Posted in Interviews Culture Klatsch Comedy All topics for Tribeca at 9:43am | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Tuesday, June 22, 2010
92Y Q&A with Bill Charlap, Artistic Director of Jazz in July Series

imageIn 1985, the 92nd Street Y introduced a premiere summer music festival to New York City audiences. Twenty-five years later, Jazz in July scintillates with one-of-a-kind performances featuring the brightest stars in jazz. We sat down with Bill Charlap (pictured above), series artistic director and one of the world’s premier jazz pianists, to get his insight on this year’s programs.

92Y: What makes Jazz in July unique in New York?

Bill Charlap: First of all, there’s 92nd Street Y’s concert hall, which is one of the most beautiful halls in New York City.

Another element are the brilliant musicians who come together in such unique combinations, like the masterful American saxophonist Phil Woods with Brazilian drummer Duduka da Fonseca, or singer Freddy Cole with a great organ trio. These sorts of pairings just don’t happen every day in New York.

And Jazz in July is a real New York festival. In New York you have a certain energy. The audience is very savvy, and our artists are the cream of the crop of New York musicians.

92Y: Tell us about your first appearance at Jazz in July.

BC: I was 20 years old, it was 1987, and I was one of four pianists: then-artistic director Dick Hyman, Roger Kellaway, Marian McPartland and myself. Boy, I was terrified. I was in awe of these people, and I still am. But it was such a dream to play in such a beautiful hall with people that I admired and respected so much.

92Y: How do you assemble your Jazz in July programming?

BC: It’s all about creating a balance that makes all six concerts work together, yet lets each one of them represent something singular: perhaps a different composer or a different way of approaching this music, or celebrating a very special musician, like in the case of Jimmy Heath this year. It’s also a matter of letting the musicians be themselves. One of the joys of programming Jazz in July is getting to play with and listen to some of my favorite musicians in the world.

More...



Posted in The Arts Interviews All topics of 92nd Street Y at 2:32pm | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Friday, April 16, 2010
92Y Q&A with Author Scott Turow of the Rock Bottom Remainders

image
Stephen King and Scott Turow performing with the Rock Bottom Remainders at Webster Hall.

Join Dave Barry, Amy Tan, Mitch Albom, Scott Turow and the rest of the literary all-stars who make up the Rock Bottom Remainders at the Nokia Theater in Times Square April 23 in a special concert benefiting the 92nd Street Y, America’s Promise and relief efforts in Haiti through World Vision. Most of the Remainders have appeared at the 92nd Street Y talking about their writing, but have you seen them play rock and roll? The Remainders have no music videos, no record contract, no Grammy® nominations—but do have over 159,000 hits on Google.  Support these wonderful causes, get your tickets today

We recently asked Scott Turow, attorney and best-selling mystery suspense novelist, a few questions about the band and his craft.

As a lawyer, writer and member of a rock band, which part of you should we trust the least?

I am always totally sincere—honestly, i really mean it, cross my heart.

Carlos Fuentes has said, “Writing is a struggle against silence.” What is the struggle of the Rock Bottom Remainders?

Against discerning tastes.

You once noted your role in the group is “to set a bottom threshold for musical ability.” That seems like a tall order for a band already named Rock Bottom Remainders. How do you do it?

Compared to me, every member of the band, even on the worst off-night, sounds like Beethoven. I am reliably bad, in all venues, seasons and musical modes.

The April 23 concert is a benefit for World Vision’s efforts on behalf of Haiti relief, the 92nd Street Y, and the America’s Promise Alliance. All of the band members have spoken at 92Y in the past (you appeared 3 times between 1989 and 2002) in your more recognizable professions as writers. What does it mean for you to support these causes and specifically the literary tradition of 92Y?

Amy Tan once noted that the members of the band have enough fun with each other that we would probably play to kill the whales, but with causes as worthy as 92Y we can sort of operate with deep cover.  A presumption of good intentions clings to anyone who says, “I’m doing this for the 92nd Street Y.” People recall the great voices of literature who have appeared there over the years and think, even as they listen to us, “some good may still come of this.”

Your first appearance at 92Y was for your breakout debut Presumed Innocent. Twenty-two years (and seven best-selling novels) later, its sequel, Innocent, is set to be published in May. Why return to Rusty Sabich? How would you describe your connection to the character?

It is clearer and clearer to me that i wanted to go back to the beginning for personal reasons.  Rusty’s voice—which is not the only one in innocent—is still automatic for me, deeply felt and largely spontaneous

And lastly, is Kindle County sponsored by Amazon yet?

No one has mentioned it yet.

» Follow 92Y on imageFacebook and imageTwitter. Join our imageeNews




Posted in The Arts Interviews All topics of 92nd Street Y at 2:18pm | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



Monday, January 25, 2010
92Y Interview: Paul O’Dette, Co-curator of the Guitar Marathon

Paul O’Dette, Co-curator of Guitar Marathon: Bach series talked with the 92nd Street Y about creating the Marathon, Bach’s lasting legacy on the 325th anniversary of his birth, why he chose to include a few non-Bach works, and more. Some highlights follow:

How was the theme for this year’s Guitar Marathon chosen?

imageIn previous Marathons, guitarists performed a wide range of repertoire over many centuries, but this year we wanted to offer diverse interpretations of a very specific repertoire. Co-curator David Spelman proposed the music of Bach, since it plays such an important part in the programming of most classical guitarists and of course lutenists.

How have you selected the artists?

David and I wanted to assemble a group of brilliant instrumentalists who have invested considerable time and thought into the performance of Bach, and whose approaches demonstrate a variety of ways in which his music may be brought to life. Bach is so universal that hearing different interpretations side by side should make for a very interesting and varied day of music-making.

What is it about Bach that brings artists to him again and again?

As with all great art, Bach’s music is multi-layered. It certainly is enjoyable the first time through, but the complexities and depth can only be fully appreciated after repeated probing and exploration. To convey the overall architecture as well as the intricate details is a challenge of which one never grows tired.

You have included a few non-Bach works— Can you tell us why?

We wanted to provide a taste of the lute music Bach listened to and emulated. His admiration for the music of Sylvius Leopold Weiss was such that he borrowed an entire Weiss lute suite. He used the lute solo as an obbligato harpsichord part over which he composed a new violin part. This Violin Sonata, BWV 1025, is not often performed because many players don’t quite know what to make of it. But we’ll perform both in order to compare Weiss’ lute version with Bach’s setting of it, in order to understand exactly how Bach put it together.

What is your personal favorite Bach lute and non-lute work?

The Fugue from BWV 1001 has been a favorite of mine since childhood, and I still find new things in it each time I play it. I am always deeply moved by the St. John Passion. The dramatic construction and pacing are so tight and the balance of affects so brilliantly judged that it feels like an opera to me. The final chorus, “Ruht wohl,” is one of my all-time favorite pieces of music.

You can read the interview in full here.

Fifteen artists will explore the many facets of Johann Sebastian Bach’s artistry during the 92Y biennial guitar extravaganza, Guitar Marathon: Bach on Sun, Jan 31, with sessions at 2 and 7 pm. Tickets can be purchased here, and those 35 and under can purchase tickets at a discount.

[Guitar Marathon: Bach—Session 1 | Guitar Marathon: Bach—Session 2]

» Follow us on imageFacebook and imageTwitter. Join our imageeNews




Posted in The Arts Interviews All topics of 92nd Street Y at 4:30pm | Link to this item | Email this item to a friend. Email This to a Friend |



  Next Page

Page 1 of 6 pages
Highlights from the
92nd Street Y and 92YTribeca universe.
About 92nd Street Y
About 92YTribeca
Contact Us
Support Us

Sort By:
92nd Street Y Topics:
92nd Street Y News
The Arts
Humanities
Jewish Life
Family
Fitness
Interviews
Culture Klatsch
Podcasts
Tell Me Why
Shablog
92YTribeca Topics:
Music
Film
Theater
Comedy
Jewish Programs
Talks
Family Programs
Cafe
Tribeca Podcasts
Search 92Y Blog

Advanced Search
Archives
<   August 2014   >
s m t w t f s
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31

February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
Recent Entries
Welcome to Podium! Issue Ten
From the Poetry Center Archive: Clare Cavanagh on Wisława Szymborska
Harkness Dance Festival Brings Exciting News
4 Tips To Getting The Most Out Of Your Tea
Are You Coming To The School Of Music Open House?
Subscribe
RSS Feed
Mobile Version
Email

UJA Federation of New York

Contact Us | Privacy Statement | Policies | Site Map | Help | Press Resources
© 2008 92nd Street Young Men's and Young Women's Hebrew Association
All Rights Reserved. Click here for directions
Web Accessibility and the 92nd Street Y